Why study the cosmos?

The “Cosmic Frontier”

Perhaps that is one of those “duh!” questions. After all, humans have wondered about the cosmos for all of recorded history and no doubt long before writing was invented. But there is a modern component to this query.

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/06/why-study-the-cosmos/, by Don Lincoln.

Quarks and gluons and partons, oh my …

The proton consists of a complex mixture of quarks and gluons. Physicists use the word parton to describe all constituents of a proton.

Quarks and gluons are more generically called “partons.”

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/05/quarks-and-gluons-and-partons-oh-my/, by Don Lincoln.

Subatomic CSI

This DZero event is not thought to have come from a Higgs boson, but an event in which a Higgs boson decayed into a pair of Z bosons would look very similar.

This DZero event is not thought to have come from a Higgs boson, but an event in which a Higgs boson decayed into a pair of Z bosons would look very similar.

How do we make sense of the mess we see in high-energy collisions?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/04/subatomic-csi/, by Don Lincoln

Combining results carefully

Combining chemicals in the wrong way can be disastrous. We have to be just as careful with physics data, or we could get an incorrect result.

Combining chemicals in the wrong way can be disastrous. We have to be just as careful with physics data, or we could get an incorrect result.

Multiple experiments at one accelerator, like DZero and CDF or CMS and ATLAS, or even experiments at different laboratories, can combine results for a more precise measurement. With measurements properly combined, we are much more confident when we announce a result.

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/03/combining-results-carefully/, by Don Lincoln

And so, ad infinitum: Smallest of the small

People are made of molecules. Molecules are made of atoms. Atoms are made of protons, neutrons and electrons, Protons and neutrons are made of quarks and gluons. Is that the end?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/03/and-so-ad-infinitum-smallest-of-the-small/, by Don Lincoln