Extra dimensions: What’s up with that?

A introduction to what physicists mean by extra dimensions (and it is not that Mr. Spock has an evil twin with a beard — sorry).

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/02/extra-dimensions-what-s-up-with-that/, by Don Lincoln.

Statistical significance: are you sure that you’re sure?

All scientific measurements are based on an incomplete access to information, such as this small sample of marbles from a larger pool.

All scientific measurements are based on an incomplete access to information, such as this small sample of marbles from a larger pool.

A description of how scientists deal with uncertainty in measurements.

http://news.fnal.gov/2011/12/statistical-significance-are-you-sure-that-you-re-sure/, by Don Lincoln.

The Standard Model: The most successful theory ever

The Standard Model is a triumph of modern physics. With this handful of particles shown here, we can explain all of the matter we have encountered, from atoms to entire galaxies.

The Standard Model is a triumph of modern physics. With this handful of particles shown here, we can explain all of the matter we have encountered, from atoms to entire galaxies.

“Physics in a Nutshell” is a new feature of the Fermilab news. In this column, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln will define one commonly used term in physics. This article was originally published on November 18, 2011.

http://news.fnal.gov/2011/11/the-standard-model-the-most-successful-theory-ever/, by Don Lincoln.

The most you can know

“Squeezing Water from a Rock” by Rebecca Gilbert

How much can you know from a limited data set? A look back of our estimates on the Top Quark mass when we had small amounts of data.

http://news.fnal.gov/2016/10/the-most-you-can-know/, by Leo Bellantoni

Special Announcement

world_in_a_nutshell

We are expanding the Fermilab Today Result of the Week podcast to include the Fermilab News feature, Physics in a nutshell.

Also, I am personally organizing a year-long photography challenge for people at Fermilab called DIFF, the Daily Image From Fermilab. If you happen to be at Fermilab now, you can find out more at https://diff.fnal.gov. Unfortunately, this URL is invisible off-site.

The CMS trigger: taming the firehose

A basic understanding of how CMS goes from 40 million potential events per second to something that can actually be recorded.

http://news.fnal.gov/2016/10/cms-trigger-taming-firehose/, by Bo Jayatilaka.

Cosmic rays are a pain

Members of Cosmic Ray VetoGgroup at the Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility hold a Cosmic Ray Veto counter. Top row, from left: Enhao Song (U. Virginia), Alexander Simonenko (JINR, Dubna), Ralf Ehrlich (U. Virginia), Yuri Oksuzian (U. Virginia), Yuri Davydov (JINR, Dubna), Martin Frank (U. Virginia), Steve Magill (Argonne). Bottom row: Vladimir Baranov (JINR, Dubna), Serdar Kurbanov (U. Virginia), Sten Hansen (Fermilab), Akram Artikov (JINR, Dubna), Shruti Shrestha (Kansas State University), Cristiana Principato (U. Virginia).

Members of Cosmic Ray VetoGgroup at the Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility hold a Cosmic Ray Veto counter. Top row, from left: Enhao Song (U. Virginia), Alexander Simonenko (JINR, Dubna), Ralf Ehrlich (U. Virginia), Yuri Oksuzian (U. Virginia), Yuri Davydov (JINR, Dubna), Martin Frank (U. Virginia), Steve Magill (Argonne). Bottom row: Vladimir Baranov (JINR, Dubna), Serdar Kurbanov (U. Virginia), Sten Hansen (Fermilab), Akram Artikov (JINR, Dubna), Shruti Shrestha (Kansas State University), Cristiana Principato (U. Virginia).

Cosmic rays are with us all the time, but they are a pain. This article outlines some of the techniques that are used at Fermilab to remove cosmic rays from experimental data.

http://news.fnal.gov/2016/10/cosmic-rays-pain/, by University of Virginia professor E. Craig Dukes.