Quarks and gluons and partons, oh my …

The proton consists of a complex mixture of quarks and gluons. Physicists use the word parton to describe all constituents of a proton.

Quarks and gluons are more generically called “partons.”

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/05/quarks-and-gluons-and-partons-oh-my/, by Don Lincoln.

Subatomic CSI

This DZero event is not thought to have come from a Higgs boson, but an event in which a Higgs boson decayed into a pair of Z bosons would look very similar.

This DZero event is not thought to have come from a Higgs boson, but an event in which a Higgs boson decayed into a pair of Z bosons would look very similar.

How do we make sense of the mess we see in high-energy collisions?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/04/subatomic-csi/, by Don Lincoln

Combining results carefully

Combining chemicals in the wrong way can be disastrous. We have to be just as careful with physics data, or we could get an incorrect result.

Combining chemicals in the wrong way can be disastrous. We have to be just as careful with physics data, or we could get an incorrect result.

Multiple experiments at one accelerator, like DZero and CDF or CMS and ATLAS, or even experiments at different laboratories, can combine results for a more precise measurement. With measurements properly combined, we are much more confident when we announce a result.

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/03/combining-results-carefully/, by Don Lincoln

And so, ad infinitum: Smallest of the small

People are made of molecules. Molecules are made of atoms. Atoms are made of protons, neutrons and electrons, Protons and neutrons are made of quarks and gluons. Is that the end?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/03/and-so-ad-infinitum-smallest-of-the-small/, by Don Lincoln

Extra dimensions: What’s up with that?

A introduction to what physicists mean by extra dimensions (and it is not that Mr. Spock has an evil twin with a beard — sorry).

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/02/extra-dimensions-what-s-up-with-that/, by Don Lincoln.

Statistical significance: are you sure that you’re sure?

All scientific measurements are based on an incomplete access to information, such as this small sample of marbles from a larger pool.

All scientific measurements are based on an incomplete access to information, such as this small sample of marbles from a larger pool.

A description of how scientists deal with uncertainty in measurements.

http://news.fnal.gov/2011/12/statistical-significance-are-you-sure-that-you-re-sure/, by Don Lincoln.