Our 500th episode: A review of the achievements at Fermilab

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Published on: July 24, 2019
Item number 5 of this podcast: “CDF and ZDero discover the top quark”. This photo was taken on March 2, 1995 of the crowd in Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium who came to hear the announcement of the discovery of the Top Quark. Your podcaster is the 12th person from the right on the 16th row from the front.

Today’s special, commemorative episode is a look back at some of the results achieved by scientists and engineers at Fermilab over 50-plus years of operation.  It is based on a photo essay that appeared in Fermilab News in 2017, our 50th year, entitled “Fifty years of discoveries and innovations.” I have selected 15 of the 50 for this extended, 14 minute podcast episode.

The original text was written by Troy Rummler. Most of the photographs were taken, over the years, by Fermilab’s outstanding photographer, Reidar Hahn. You can find the full article and all 50 photographs at http://tinyurl.com/fnal50.

How do I explain quantum computing?

Categories: Physics in a Nutshell
Published on: July 17, 2019
What in the heck is this image? The title of the image is “Sym Learning Speak Quantum”, for what that’s worth.

Dr. Lyon gives a lay-person’s introduction to the concepts of quantum computing.

By Adam Lyon. Click here for the article at Fermilab’s web site.

Gravity waves from black holes

Image: Genze/NASA

More than a thousand million years before dinosaurs roamed Earth, a ripple in space was spreading through the universe. Traveling at 300,000 kilometers per second, the speed of light, it had covered 95 percent of its journey to Earth when the dinosaurs became extinct.

By Mike Albrow. You can read this Physics in a Nutshell article here.

Search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS and MINOS+

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: July 3, 2019
MINOS far detector as seen in 2012. Photo: Reidar Hahn

The MINOS+ collaboration at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab has published a paper in Physical Review Letters about their latest results: new constraints on the existence of sterile neutrinos. The collaboration has exploited new high-statistics data and a new analysis regime to set more stringent boundaries on the possibility of sterile neutrinos mixing with muon neutrinos. They have significantly improved on their previous results published in 2016. With close to 40 publications that have garnered more than 6,000 citations, MINOS has been at the forefront of studying neutrino oscillations physics since its first data-taking days in 2005.

This article was written by the MINOS+ Collaboration. You can read the article here.

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