Dialing it in for Earth

Categories: Uncategorized
Published on: August 21, 2019
The Remote Operations Center – West enables scientists to monitor neutrino experiments from off site, which helps cut down on airplane travel — and carbon dioxide emissions. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Fermilab has an impact on science in many ways. In addition to the laboratory’s lead role in high-energy physics, we contribute to astrophysics, computing, accelerator science and technology, and many other scientific initiatives.

We also contribute to global warming. To run a complex as large as Fermilab requires significant energy resources. Our laboratory recognizes this is a challenge, and many of us have made a significant effort to reduce our carbon footprint whenever and wherever possible. 

By Bill Pellico. You can read the article at the Fermilab news site.

Quarks, squarks, stops and charm at this year’s Moriond conference

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: August 14, 2019
Fermilab research associates (RAs) Kevin Pedro and Nadja Strobbe presented a variety of CMS and ATLAS research results at the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference.

This March, scientists from around the world gathered in LaThuile, Italy, for the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference, one of the longest running and most prestigious conferences in particle physics. This conference is broken into two distinct weeks, with the first week usually covering electroweak physics and the second covering processes involving quantum chromodynamics. Fermilab and the LHC Physics Center were well represented at the conference.
By Don Lincoln. You can read the entire article at the Fermilab News web site.

In the round: a new design for high-temperature superconducting magnets

Published on: August 7, 2019
Compared to other configurations, this novel design is more suitable for high-temperature superconductors, which are capable of operating up to a temperature of 77 Kelvin (a temperature that liquid nitrogen can maintain).

Two new simple, elegant magnets for particle accelerators could lead to significant cost savings. Researchers have found a way to create high-temperature superconducting magnets that could substantially simplify magnet fabrication and cooling.

UPDATE: The original audio file had none of the music, and sounded rather sad because of that, IMHO.

By Vladimir Kashikhin. You can read this article at Fermilab’s News web site.

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