Gotta catch ’em all: new NOvA results with neutrinos and antineutrinos

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: November 27, 2019
Fermilab’s NOvA neutrino experiment studies neutrino oscillations using a powerful neutrino beam produced by the lab’s accelerator complex. The beam, made of muon neutrinos, is sent to NOvA’s two detectors — one located at Fermilab and one located about 800 kilometers away in Minnesota, pictured here.

NOvA’s latest measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters have been published in Physical Review Letters. The data were recorded between 2014 and 2019 and correspond to 8.85 x 1020 protons-on-target of neutrino beam and 12.33 x 1020 protons-on-target of antineutrino beam. This represents a 78% increase in the amount of antineutrino data compared to NOvA’s previous results, presented at the Neutrino 2018 conference.

By  Steven Calvez and Erika Catano Mur. You can read the article at the Fermilab News web site.

Department of Energy awards Fermilab funding for next-generation dark matter research

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: November 20, 2019
Engineers work on highly sensitive skipper CCDs. Researchers will use these sensors to search for low-mass dark matter particles. Photo: Reidar Hahn

In October 2019, the Department of Energy announced that it has awarded scientists at its Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory funding to boost research on dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up an astounding 85% of the matter in the universe.

The award will fund two Fermilab projects focused on searching for dark matter particles of low mass — less than the mass of a proton.

A press releases from Fermilab, edited by Leah Hesla.

CMS precisely measures the mass of the Higgs boson

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: November 13, 2019
Event in which a candidate Standard Model Higgs boson decays into two photons indicated by the green towers representing energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter.

Tthe CMS Collaboration has just announced the most precise measurement of the Higgs boson’s mass achieved so far.  CMS physicists recently measured the mass of the Higgs boson to be 125.35 GeV with a precision of 0.15 GeV, an uncertainty of roughly 0.1%!  This very high precision was achieved thanks to the enormous amount of work spent over many years to carefully calibrate and model the CMS detector when it measures the particles necessary for this measurement (electrons, muons, and photons).

By the CMS Collaboration. You can read this article at the CERN web site.

Survey delivers on dark energy with multiple probes

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Published on: November 6, 2019
Researchers used the Blanco telescope in conducting the Dark Energy Survey. The Milky Way is on the left of the sky, with the Magellanic clouds in the center. Photo: Reidar Hahn

The Dark Energy Survey is the first experiment to demonstrate the immense power and promise of this combined-probes approach to survey design. The combined-probes approach is the basis for all major next-generation dark energy experiments in the 2020s including the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. It enables scientists to make the most precise measurement of dark energy possible while protecting against measurement bias.

By Michael Troxel. You can read the article here, at the Fermilab News web site.

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