An interaction of slipping beams

Published on: September 18, 2019
A new method improves the circulating beams in the Recycler Ring (located beneath the ponds shown here), a major component of Fermilab’s accelerator chain. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Burov summarize the results of a study in which he instabilities in high intensity particle beams and concluded that a special feedback would make the beams much more stable. The required feedback was then designed and implemented by Nathan Eddy and his Fermilab team. The result was a 20% increase in proton beam intensity and a reduction in beam loss by a factor of 2.

By Alexey Burov. You can read the article at the Fermilab News site.

In the round: a new design for high-temperature superconducting magnets

Published on: August 7, 2019
Compared to other configurations, this novel design is more suitable for high-temperature superconductors, which are capable of operating up to a temperature of 77 Kelvin (a temperature that liquid nitrogen can maintain).

Two new simple, elegant magnets for particle accelerators could lead to significant cost savings. Researchers have found a way to create high-temperature superconducting magnets that could substantially simplify magnet fabrication and cooling.

UPDATE: The original audio file had none of the music, and sounded rather sad because of that, IMHO.

By Vladimir Kashikhin. You can read this article at Fermilab’s News web site.

Our 500th episode: A review of the achievements at Fermilab

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Published on: July 24, 2019
Item number 5 of this podcast: “CDF and ZDero discover the top quark”. This photo was taken on March 2, 1995 of the crowd in Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium who came to hear the announcement of the discovery of the Top Quark. Your podcaster is the 12th person from the right on the 16th row from the front.

Today’s special, commemorative episode is a look back at some of the results achieved by scientists and engineers at Fermilab over 50-plus years of operation.  It is based on a photo essay that appeared in Fermilab News in 2017, our 50th year, entitled “Fifty years of discoveries and innovations.” I have selected 15 of the 50 for this extended, 14 minute podcast episode.

The original text was written by Troy Rummler. Most of the photographs were taken, over the years, by Fermilab’s outstanding photographer, Reidar Hahn. You can find the full article and all 50 photographs at http://tinyurl.com/fnal50.

From turkeys to turn-keys


A superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity is mounted and connected to a cryocooler, cooling the cavity without the use of liquid helium. This new device could make it easier to produce high-average-power electron beams for industrial applications. Photo: Marty Murphy

The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) at Fermilab is on a mission to build a high-power, compact, superconducting electron beam accelerator that will serve all of these purposes.

By Charles Thangaraj

Read the article here.

Single-electron beam observed in IOTA for the first time

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Published on: May 15, 2019

Scientists and engineers stand by screens that display IOTA activity. The photo was taken on Oct. 31, 10:15 p.m., when three electrons were circulating in the machine. Aleksandr  Romanov, left, points to the computer screen on the left, where a camera image of the beam was visible. The screen on the right shows one of the first plots of the discrete steps. Photo: Giulio Stancari

Just two months ago, in September 2018, the IOTA ring was successfully commissioned, and the program of the advanced beam physics studies has since begun. One of the most interesting scientific topics at IOTA will be studies of beams made of a single electron.

By Vladimir Shiltsev and Giulio Stancari

You can read the article here.

An aside about listening to this podcast.

I have gotten some feedback that some of the articles are a little hard to follow.  Indeed, some of them are.  My suggestions to help you understand these podcasts better are:

  1. Do not speed up the podcast on your client player.  In fact, slowing them down a little will give you an opportunity to digest some of the more difficult ideas as they stream into your ears
  2. Read along!  Since you are reading this, you have found the WordPress site where this podcast originates. So you can click on the link above and read the article.

Superconducting film technology leads to record performance for low-frequency SRF cavity


A low-frequency, single-cell cavity is under preparation niobium-tin coating. Photo courtesy of Sam Posen

Superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are the “muscle” of many modern particle accelerators. By cooling these devices to cryogenic temperatures (usually around 2 Kelvin, or minus 456 degrees Fahrenheit) and inputting electric power, SRF cavities increase the energy of beams of charged particles passing through them. Making cavities out of superconducting materials dramatically increases their efficiency (represented by a cavity’s quality factor, or Q), allowing them to accelerate beams to high energies over short distances, without leaving long cool-down times between particle beam pulses.

By Sam Posen .

Read the article here.

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