CMS precisely measures the mass of the Higgs boson

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: November 13, 2019
Event in which a candidate Standard Model Higgs boson decays into two photons indicated by the green towers representing energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter.

Tthe CMS Collaboration has just announced the most precise measurement of the Higgs boson’s mass achieved so far.  CMS physicists recently measured the mass of the Higgs boson to be 125.35 GeV with a precision of 0.15 GeV, an uncertainty of roughly 0.1%!  This very high precision was achieved thanks to the enormous amount of work spent over many years to carefully calibrate and model the CMS detector when it measures the particles necessary for this measurement (electrons, muons, and photons).

By the CMS Collaboration. You can read this article at the CERN web site.

Quarks, squarks, stops and charm at this year’s Moriond conference

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: August 14, 2019
Fermilab research associates (RAs) Kevin Pedro and Nadja Strobbe presented a variety of CMS and ATLAS research results at the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference.

This March, scientists from around the world gathered in LaThuile, Italy, for the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference, one of the longest running and most prestigious conferences in particle physics. This conference is broken into two distinct weeks, with the first week usually covering electroweak physics and the second covering processes involving quantum chromodynamics. Fermilab and the LHC Physics Center were well represented at the conference.
By Don Lincoln. You can read the entire article at the Fermilab News web site.

Our 500th episode: A review of the achievements at Fermilab

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Published on: July 24, 2019
Item number 5 of this podcast: “CDF and ZDero discover the top quark”. This photo was taken on March 2, 1995 of the crowd in Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium who came to hear the announcement of the discovery of the Top Quark. Your podcaster is the 12th person from the right on the 16th row from the front.

Today’s special, commemorative episode is a look back at some of the results achieved by scientists and engineers at Fermilab over 50-plus years of operation.  It is based on a photo essay that appeared in Fermilab News in 2017, our 50th year, entitled “Fifty years of discoveries and innovations.” I have selected 15 of the 50 for this extended, 14 minute podcast episode.

The original text was written by Troy Rummler. Most of the photographs were taken, over the years, by Fermilab’s outstanding photographer, Reidar Hahn. You can find the full article and all 50 photographs at http://tinyurl.com/fnal50.

Professor Higgs’ Particle

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Published on: June 26, 2019
François Englert (left) and Peter Higgs speak to conference attendees at CERN on July 4, 2012, on the occasion of the announcement of the discovery of a Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Photo: Maximilien Brice/CERN

Fifty years ago physicists, pondering how particles get mass, had suggested that there is another field, but one with no direction and the same value everywhere throughout the universe. 

Dr. Higgs said, “If that field exists, there should be a particle that goes with it,” just as the electromagnetic field, light, has a particle, the photon. The Higgs particle is heavier than a silver atom but trillions of times smaller. Perhaps it has no size at all! It disintegrates to lighter particles immediately and has no practical applications, so what’s the big deal?

By Mike Albrow. Click here for the Fermilab article.

Which way did it go? A view from the top

Categories: CDF, DZero, Energy Frontier
Tags: No Tags
Published on: February 20, 2019

This table summarizes the forward-backward asymmetry measurements in top quark-antiquark events at the Tevatron.

Over the last decade, measurements by the CDF and DZero collaborations of how top quarks flee the scene of the crime, the so-called “forward-backward asymmetry,” caused quite a stir as they clashed with then state-of-the-art theoretical predictions for the Tevatron. The disagreement tantalized physicists with visions of new, unexpected particles influencing the behavior of the top quark. Now, with the final, combined word from the experiments, Fermilab has placed a capstone on its study of the forward-backward asymmetry, and the measurements and theory now agree.

By Ziqing Hong and Jon Wilson

The article can be found here: http://news.fnal.gov/2017/12/which-way-did-it-go-a-view-from-the-top/

Coping with high luminosity

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Published on: June 4, 2017

A glimpse into how we sort out the plethora of collisions we get in our physics experiments.

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/07/coping-with-high-luminosity/, by Don Lincoln.

Why high energy?

Published on: May 1, 2017

Three good reasons why Fermilab, and other physics labs, aspire for “high energy”.

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/06/why-high-energy/, by Don Lincoln.

And so, ad infinitum: Smallest of the small

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Published on: February 19, 2017

People are made of molecules. Molecules are made of atoms. Atoms are made of protons, neutrons and electrons, Protons and neutrons are made of quarks and gluons. Is that the end?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/03/and-so-ad-infinitum-smallest-of-the-small/, by Don Lincoln

The most you can know

Categories: DZero, Energy Frontier
Tags:
Published on: December 14, 2016

“Squeezing Water from a Rock” by Rebecca Gilbert

How much can you know from a limited data set? A look back of our estimates on the Top Quark mass when we had small amounts of data.

http://news.fnal.gov/2016/10/the-most-you-can-know/, by Leo Bellantoni

The CMS trigger: taming the firehose

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: December 11, 2016

A basic understanding of how CMS goes from 40 million potential events per second to something that can actually be recorded.

http://news.fnal.gov/2016/10/cms-trigger-taming-firehose/, by Bo Jayatilaka.

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