An interaction of slipping beams

Published on: September 18, 2019
A new method improves the circulating beams in the Recycler Ring (located beneath the ponds shown here), a major component of Fermilab’s accelerator chain. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Burov summarize the results of a study in which he instabilities in high intensity particle beams and concluded that a special feedback would make the beams much more stable. The required feedback was then designed and implemented by Nathan Eddy and his Fermilab team. The result was a 20% increase in proton beam intensity and a reduction in beam loss by a factor of 2.

By Alexey Burov. You can read the article at the Fermilab News site.

CMS upgrades take a big step

Categories: CMS/LHC
Published on: September 11, 2019
Maral Alyari, SUNY-Buffalo, and Stephanie Timpone, Fermilab, work on the forward pixel detector at SiDet in 2015. Photo: Reidar Hahn

“Complete the LHC Phase 1 Upgrades….” is how the first project-specific and concrete recommendation (Recommendation 10) of the 2014 Report of the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5), “Building for Discovery,” starts. This short phrase has been the mission statement for U.S. CMS scientists from Fermilab and around 30 U.S. institutes for the last six years. On May 1, with the successful outcome of the Department of Energy Critical Decision 4 review, the project has been completed.

By Steve Nahn. You can read the entire article at the Fermilab News site.

CMS publication count climbs to 900!

Categories: CMS/LHC
Published on: September 4, 2019
The author, Boaz Klima.

The CMS collaboration reached a major milestone last week by submitting for publication its 900th paper. As you can see in CMS’ publications website, starting in early 2010, CMS has been publishing about 100 papers every year on physics analyses using LHC collision data. The publications timeline of the 880 collider-data papers, split by physics topics, is available online.

By Boaz Klima. You can read the article at the Fermilab News Site.

Dialing it in for Earth

Categories: Uncategorized
Published on: August 21, 2019
The Remote Operations Center – West enables scientists to monitor neutrino experiments from off site, which helps cut down on airplane travel — and carbon dioxide emissions. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Fermilab has an impact on science in many ways. In addition to the laboratory’s lead role in high-energy physics, we contribute to astrophysics, computing, accelerator science and technology, and many other scientific initiatives.

We also contribute to global warming. To run a complex as large as Fermilab requires significant energy resources. Our laboratory recognizes this is a challenge, and many of us have made a significant effort to reduce our carbon footprint whenever and wherever possible. 

By Bill Pellico. You can read the article at the Fermilab news site.

Quarks, squarks, stops and charm at this year’s Moriond conference

Categories: CMS/LHC, Energy Frontier
Published on: August 14, 2019
Fermilab research associates (RAs) Kevin Pedro and Nadja Strobbe presented a variety of CMS and ATLAS research results at the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference.

This March, scientists from around the world gathered in LaThuile, Italy, for the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference, one of the longest running and most prestigious conferences in particle physics. This conference is broken into two distinct weeks, with the first week usually covering electroweak physics and the second covering processes involving quantum chromodynamics. Fermilab and the LHC Physics Center were well represented at the conference.
By Don Lincoln. You can read the entire article at the Fermilab News web site.

In the round: a new design for high-temperature superconducting magnets

Published on: August 7, 2019
Compared to other configurations, this novel design is more suitable for high-temperature superconductors, which are capable of operating up to a temperature of 77 Kelvin (a temperature that liquid nitrogen can maintain).

Two new simple, elegant magnets for particle accelerators could lead to significant cost savings. Researchers have found a way to create high-temperature superconducting magnets that could substantially simplify magnet fabrication and cooling.

UPDATE: The original audio file had none of the music, and sounded rather sad because of that, IMHO.

By Vladimir Kashikhin. You can read this article at Fermilab’s News web site.

Our 500th episode: A review of the achievements at Fermilab

Tags: No Tags
Published on: July 24, 2019
Item number 5 of this podcast: “CDF and ZDero discover the top quark”. This photo was taken on March 2, 1995 of the crowd in Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium who came to hear the announcement of the discovery of the Top Quark. Your podcaster is the 12th person from the right on the 16th row from the front.

Today’s special, commemorative episode is a look back at some of the results achieved by scientists and engineers at Fermilab over 50-plus years of operation.  It is based on a photo essay that appeared in Fermilab News in 2017, our 50th year, entitled “Fifty years of discoveries and innovations.” I have selected 15 of the 50 for this extended, 14 minute podcast episode.

The original text was written by Troy Rummler. Most of the photographs were taken, over the years, by Fermilab’s outstanding photographer, Reidar Hahn. You can find the full article and all 50 photographs at http://tinyurl.com/fnal50.

How do I explain quantum computing?

Categories: Physics in a Nutshell
Published on: July 17, 2019
What in the heck is this image? The title of the image is “Sym Learning Speak Quantum”, for what that’s worth.

Dr. Lyon gives a lay-person’s introduction to the concepts of quantum computing.

By Adam Lyon. Click here for the article at Fermilab’s web site.

Gravity waves from black holes

Image: Genze/NASA

More than a thousand million years before dinosaurs roamed Earth, a ripple in space was spreading through the universe. Traveling at 300,000 kilometers per second, the speed of light, it had covered 95 percent of its journey to Earth when the dinosaurs became extinct.

By Mike Albrow. You can read this Physics in a Nutshell article here.

Search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS and MINOS+

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: July 3, 2019
MINOS far detector as seen in 2012. Photo: Reidar Hahn

The MINOS+ collaboration at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab has published a paper in Physical Review Letters about their latest results: new constraints on the existence of sterile neutrinos. The collaboration has exploited new high-statistics data and a new analysis regime to set more stringent boundaries on the possibility of sterile neutrinos mixing with muon neutrinos. They have significantly improved on their previous results published in 2016. With close to 40 publications that have garnered more than 6,000 citations, MINOS has been at the forefront of studying neutrino oscillations physics since its first data-taking days in 2005.

This article was written by the MINOS+ Collaboration. You can read the article here.

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