The secret to measuring the energy of an antineutrino

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: March 20, 2019

Scientists at Fermilab use the MINERvA to make measurements of neutrino interactions that can support the work of other neutrino experiments. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Scientists study tiny particles called neutrinos to learn about how our universe evolved. These particles, well-known for being tough to detect, could tell the story of how matter won out over antimatter a fraction of a second after the Big Bang and, consequently, why we’re here at all.

news.fnal.gov/2018/06/the-secret-to-measuring-the-energy-of-an-antineutrino/

MicroBooNE measures charged-particle multiplicity in first neutrino-beam-based result

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: March 13, 2019

This plot shows the azimuthal angle difference distribution for events with an observed multiplicity of two for data (points with error bars) and model (histogram). The peaks near positive and negative pi indicate presence of the quasielastic scattering process, while the distribution between the peaks is consistent with predicted contributions from resonance production. The shaded blue area is the estimated cosmic ray background.

MicroBooNE’s first neutrino-beam-based physics result, submitted to the journal Physics Review D this spring, launches the experiment’s journey along this path.

https://news.fnal.gov/2018/05/microboone-measures-charged-particle-multiplicity-in-first-neutrino-beam-based-result/

May 31, 2018 – By Tim Bolton and Aleena Rafique

Neutrino experiment at Fermilab delivers an unprecedented measurement

MiniBooNE scientists demonstrate a new way to probe the nucleus with muon neutrinos.


This interior view of the MiniBooNE detector tank shows the array of photodetectors used to pick up the light particles that are created when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus inside the tank. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Tiny particles known as neutrinos are an excellent tool to study the inner workings of atomic nuclei. Unlike electrons or protons, neutrinos have no electric charge, and they interact with an atom’s core only via the weak nuclear force. This makes them a unique tool for probing the building blocks of matter. But the challenge is that neutrinos are hard to produce and detect, and it is very difficult to determine the energy that a neutrino has when it hits an atom.

By Kurt Reisselmann.

Read this article at the Fermilab web site: http://news.fnal.gov/2018/04/neutrino-experiment-at-fermilab-delivers-an-unprecedented-measurement/

The secret to measuring an antineutrino’s energy

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: February 27, 2019

Miranda Elkins (left) worked on this with Rik Gran (right) while she was a master’s student at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. She is now a Ph.D. student at Iowa State University.

It is no secret that neutrinos change flavor or oscillate as they travel from one place to another, and that the amount they change depends on how much time they have to change. This time is directly related to the distance the neutrino traveled and the energy of the neutrino itself. Measuring the distance is easy. The hard part is measuring the neutrino energy.

Read the entire article at the Fermilab web site: http://news.fnal.gov/2018/03/the-secret-to-measuring-an-antineutrinos-energy/

Which way did it go? A view from the top

Categories: CDF, DZero, Energy Frontier
Tags: No Tags
Published on: February 20, 2019

This table summarizes the forward-backward asymmetry measurements in top quark-antiquark events at the Tevatron.

Over the last decade, measurements by the CDF and DZero collaborations of how top quarks flee the scene of the crime, the so-called “forward-backward asymmetry,” caused quite a stir as they clashed with then state-of-the-art theoretical predictions for the Tevatron. The disagreement tantalized physicists with visions of new, unexpected particles influencing the behavior of the top quark. Now, with the final, combined word from the experiments, Fermilab has placed a capstone on its study of the forward-backward asymmetry, and the measurements and theory now agree.

By Ziqing Hong and Jon Wilson

The article can be found here: http://news.fnal.gov/2017/12/which-way-did-it-go-a-view-from-the-top/

Photons continue to enlighten physicists

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Tags: No Tags
Published on: February 13, 2019

The cross section is presented as a function of the transverse energy of the photon.

You may be familiar with particles of light, called photons. Physicists give the name “prompt photons” to those that are produced by two particles smashing together — hard collisions — as contrasted with those resulting from the decay of other particles. The Tevatron produced prompt photons by the hard collisions between protons and antiprotons.

By: Andy Beretvas and Alessandra Lucà

The article is here: http://news.fnal.gov/2017/12/photons-continue-to-enlighten-physicists/

What’s the deal with antimatter?

Categories: Uncategorized
Tags: No Tags
Published on: February 6, 2019
Antimatter can be found in science fiction and in fact. It both powers fictional starships and is associated with one of the most perplexing mysteries in modern physics. Since our theories suggest that matter and antimatter should have been made in equal quantities, yet we observe only matter, this mystery is really quite fundamental: Why are we here at all?

http://news.fnal.gov/2012/09/what-s-the-deal-with-antimatter/, by Don Lincoln

The MiniBooNE search for dark matter

Categories: Uncategorized
Tags: No Tags
Published on: January 30, 2019

This schematic shows the experimental setup for the dark matter search. Protons (blue arrow on the left) generated by the Fermilab accelerator chain strike a thick steel block. This interaction produces secondary particles, some of which are absorbed by the block. Others, including photons and perhaps dark-sector photons, symbolized by V, are unaffected. These dark photons decay into dark matter, shown as χ, and travel to the MiniBooNE detector, depicted as the sphere on the right.

Some theorists speculate that dark matter particles could belong to a “hidden sector” and that there may be portals to this hidden sector from the Standard Model. The portals allow hidden-sector particles to trickle into Standard Model interactions. A large sensitive particle detector, placed in an intense particle beam and equipped with a mechanism to suppress the Standard Model interactions, could unveil these new particles.

By Ranjan Dharmapalan and Tyler Thornton

https://news.fnal.gov/2017/07/miniboone-search-dark-matter/

Perfecting the noise-canceling neutrino detector

Categories: Uncategorized
Published on: January 24, 2019

This two-dimensional event display shows the raw signal (a) before and (b) after offline noise filtering. Clean event signatures were recovered once all excess noise was removed.

If you have ever tried to watch a movie or listen to music on a plane, then you know the problem well: The roar of the engines makes it difficult to hear what’s being piped through the speakers — even when those speakers are situated in or on your ear. 

In a similar manner, at the MicroBooNE detector we identify and filter out several excess noise sources.

Click on this to go to the Fermilab News article:

We need your feedback

Categories: Uncategorized
Tags: No Tags
Published on: January 16, 2019

This is a meta podcast – I talk about the podcast itself. The bottom line: I really don’t want to do this podcast unless I can confirm that people, real human beings, are listening.

Please send me an email at FermiPodcast – at – G-Mail DOT Com.

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