Superconducting film technology leads to record performance for low-frequency SRF cavity


A low-frequency, single-cell cavity is under preparation niobium-tin coating. Photo courtesy of Sam Posen

Superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are the “muscle” of many modern particle accelerators. By cooling these devices to cryogenic temperatures (usually around 2 Kelvin, or minus 456 degrees Fahrenheit) and inputting electric power, SRF cavities increase the energy of beams of charged particles passing through them. Making cavities out of superconducting materials dramatically increases their efficiency (represented by a cavity’s quality factor, or Q), allowing them to accelerate beams to high energies over short distances, without leaving long cool-down times between particle beam pulses.

By Sam Posen .

Read the article here.

Chopping beam to your taste

August 21, 2018 | Leah Hesla and Alexander Shemyakin

For lunch, do you enjoy having your tomato whole, in slices or finely chopped? It probably depends on the dish: The tomato could serve as a standalone fruit snack, as part of a sandwich or as a salad topping. Similarly, different Fermilab experiments may want particles beams coming to them in different chunks. Now they have a chopping “knife” to prepare the beam to their taste: the new beam chopper for the future Fermilab linear accelerator.


This is the assembled 200-ohm kicker for the MEBT chopper. Photo: Reidar Hahn
news.fnal.gov/2018/08/chopping-beam-to-your-taste/
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