Finding the missing pieces of a puzzle of an antineutrino’s energy

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: October 2, 2019
This graphic illustrates a neutrino interaction in the MINERvA detector. The rectangular box highlights the spot where a neutrino interacted inside the detector. The square box just above it highlights the appearance of a neutron resulting from the neutrino interaction. Image: MINERvA

Charged particles, like protons and electrons, can be characterized by the trails of atoms these particles ionize. In contrast, neutrinos and their antiparticle partners almost never ionize atoms, so their interactions have to be pieced together by how they break nuclei apart.

But when the breakup produces a neutron, it can silently carry away a critical piece of information: some of the antineutrino’s energy.

By  Andrew Olivier. You can read this article here, at the Fermilab News web site.

The secret to measuring the energy of an antineutrino

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: March 20, 2019

Scientists at Fermilab use the MINERvA to make measurements of neutrino interactions that can support the work of other neutrino experiments. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Scientists study tiny particles called neutrinos to learn about how our universe evolved. These particles, well-known for being tough to detect, could tell the story of how matter won out over antimatter a fraction of a second after the Big Bang and, consequently, why we’re here at all.

news.fnal.gov/2018/06/the-secret-to-measuring-the-energy-of-an-antineutrino/

The secret to measuring an antineutrino’s energy

Categories: Intensity Frontier
Published on: February 27, 2019

Miranda Elkins (left) worked on this with Rik Gran (right) while she was a master’s student at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. She is now a Ph.D. student at Iowa State University.

It is no secret that neutrinos change flavor or oscillate as they travel from one place to another, and that the amount they change depends on how much time they have to change. This time is directly related to the distance the neutrino traveled and the energy of the neutrino itself. Measuring the distance is easy. The hard part is measuring the neutrino energy.

Read the entire article at the Fermilab web site: http://news.fnal.gov/2018/03/the-secret-to-measuring-an-antineutrinos-energy/

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